See More on Facebook

Analysis

Lion Air flight was unfit to fly

A Lion Air flight which crashed in October should not have been in the air, a safety board finds.


Written by

Updated: November 29, 2018

The aircraft used for Lion Air flight JT610, which crashed into the Java Sea during a flight to Pangkalpinang, Bangka Belitung Islands, from Jakarta on Oct. 29 was in bad condition during previous flights, the National Transportation Safety Committee (KNKT) has revealed.

The fact was revealed after the committee’s investigation into the downed aircraft’s flight data recorder (FDR), investigator Nurcahyo Utomo said on Wednesday upon releasing the KNKT’s preliminary report on the accident.

“The FDR recorded that the plane’s stick shaker was active prior to and during the flight from Denpasar, Bali, to Jakarta the night before the accident,” Nurcahyo said. A stick shaker is a device that gives a pilot warning of an imminent stall.

Apart from the stick shaker, the pilot of the Denpasar flight noted several other warning signs that appeared on the flight display, including one concerning the difference in the indicated airspeed.

The pilot also noticed that the airplane experienced an automatic trimming nose down. The copilot reacted by turning off the autopilot and flying the aircraft manually until it safely landed in Jakarta.

“In our opinion, the pilot should not have flown the aircraft in its condition,” Nurcahyo said.

After landing, the pilot reported the malfunction to the engineers, who performed a number of maintenance checks on the aircraft before it was used for the Pangkalpinang flight.

The JT610 flight was carrying 189 people, comprising eight flight crew and 181 passengers, including three minors.

The preliminary report, which contains the facts and evidence gathered by KNKT, was released 30 days after the accident.



Enjoyed this story? Share it.


The Jakarta Post
About the Author: The Jakarta Post is one of Indonesia's leading English-language daily newspapers.

Eastern Briefings

All you need to know about Asia


Our Eastern Briefings Newsletter presents curated stories from 22 Asian newspapers from South, Southeast and Northeast Asia.

Sign up and stay updated with the latest news.



By providing us with your email address, you agree to our Privacy Policy and Terms of Service.

View Today's Newsletter Here

Analysis

‘No rush’ on NK denuclearization, Trump says

Trump and Kim are due to meet in Vietnam at the end of this month. US President Donald Trump said on Tuesday that he had no strict timeline for North Korea’s ultimate denuclearization as negotiators from the two countries head to Vietnam for last-minute talks ahead of a second summit next week. “I’m in no rush. There’s no testing. As long as there is no testing, I’m in no rush,” Trump told reporters at the White House after a phone conversation with South Korean President Moon Jae-in. “I’d just like to see, ultimately, denuclearization of North Korea,” he said. The US president made similar remarks last week, in an apparen


By The Korea Herald
February 21, 2019

Analysis

Imran Khan responds to Indian accusations after attack

Pakistan will address actionable evidence if shared by Delhi, PM Khan tells India after Pulwama attack. In a video message, Prime Minister Imran Khan on Tuesday said Islamabad will take action if Delhi shares any actionable evidence concerning last week’s suicide bombing in occupied Kashmir’s Pulwama area which had targeted Indian paramilitary soldiers. While offering cooperation and another chance at a dialogue over the Kashmir issue, the premier also warned India against any act of aggression, saying Pakistan will not hesitate in retaliating to a provocation. However, he made it clear that he hopes better sense will prevail. The premier explained he


By Dawn
February 20, 2019

Analysis

Press freedom is deteriorating in Asia, elections may offer a reset button

With many countries going to polls this year, the electorate across Asia have a chance to turn around a worrying press freedom situation. Maria Ressa’s arrest on Wednesday was the latest in a string of blatant attacks on the freedom of the press in Southeast Asia. For those that don’t know, Ressa is an award-winning journalist and CEO of the news website the Rappler. Her coverage of Philippines President Rodrigo Duterte’s extra-judicial war on drugs has received recognition far beyond her borders and as such, she is seen as a direct threat to the government. The latest arrest, made without prior warning, stemmed from a libel case where the complaint was filed five years after the initial story was published. Numerous press alliances, including the Asia News Network, have condemned the arrest as a blatant attack on freedom of the press. As the Philippines chapter of the Centre for Media Freedom and


By Cod Satrusayang
February 15, 2019

Analysis

Smog over Pakistan near Punjab not India’s fault

Poor fuel quality, not crop burning in India, is the villain in the battle for clean air. After significant rainfall at the end of January, Lahoris are breathing, quite literally, a sigh of relief having braved the worst of the smog season. The smog season is now a routine affair in the provincial metropolis, when a thick layer of pollutant envelopes the city from October to January. The episodes of smog in 2016, 2017 and 


By Dawn
February 13, 2019

Analysis

International medical assistance company threatens Nepal

A Post investigation shows Australia-based Traveller Assist used the helicopter rescue scam to market itself as the sole representative of global insurance firms. In a letter to Nepal’s tourism minister last month, the managing director of Traveller Assist, an Australia-based medical assistance company, threatened the government that his clients would stop issuing travel insurance policies in Nepal if the administration does not take action against trekking agencies, helicopter companies and hospitals that have been involved in fraudulent rescues. “I am writing on b


By The Kathmandu Post
February 12, 2019

Analysis

Thailand is headed for another political crisis and it can’t stop itself

Prayuth Chan-ocha may be prime minister after elections but what comes after is much harder. On the 16th of May, 1877, French President Patrice de Mac-Mahon dismissed then Prime Minister Jules Simon and named a successor who was rejected by the house of parliament. Mac-Mahon responded by dissolving parliament unilaterally leading to a constitutional crisis which changed the landscape of French politics until well into the 20th century. Thailand may soon experience something similar.


By Cod Satrusayang
February 11, 2019