See More on Facebook

Diplomacy

Beijing summons US ambassador over Huawei arrest

China adds that it rejects US extradition claims.


Written by

Updated: December 10, 2018

Beijing on Sunday (Dec 9) summoned US Ambassador to China Terry Branstad and demanded that the United States withdraw the arrest warrant against a top Huawei executive detained in Canada.

Chinese Vice-Foreign Minister Le Yucheng made solemn representations and lodged strong protests with Mr Bransted for the “unreasonable” request that the US made to Canada to arrest Ms Meng Wanzhou while she was on transit in Vancouver.

“China will take further action based on US’ actions,” he said, according to a statement on the Chinese Foreign Ministry’s website released last night, noting the “very nasty nature” of the US action.

This comes after Mr Le made a similar protest to Canada’s ambassador in Beijing on Saturday.

Ms Meng, chief financial officer of Huawei and daughter of the company’s founder, was arrested on Dec 1. She has been accused of being personally involved in tricking banks into violating US sanctions on Iran.

Her arrest has angered Beijing and heightened tensions between China and the US just days after both countries called a ceasefire on their on-going trade war.

Last Friday, her first bail hearing was held at the Supreme Court of British Columbia. The hearing will continue Monday.

The case has attracted widespread attention in China with state media slamming Canada for the arrest, calling it an act to humiliate China as well as a violation of human rights.

They warned that Canada risked facing severe consequences, including severe sanctions from China, if Ms Meng’s case is not handled properly and in a humane manner.

Reuters reported that US Senator Marco Rubio told CBS  Face the Nation on Sunday he would “100 per cent absolutely” introduce something in the new Congress that would ban Chinese telecom firms from doing business in the United States.

“We have to understand Chinese companies are not like American companies. OK. We can’t even get Apple to crack an iPhone for us in a terrorist investigation,” he said.

“When the Chinese ask a telecom company, we want you to turn over all the data you’ve gathered in the country you’re operating in, they will do it. No court order. Nothing like that. They will just do it. They have to. We need to understand that.”

A commentary in the Chinese Communist Party’s (CCP) official People’s Daily said Canada will pay “a heavy price” if it does not “correct its mistake”.

While China would not “cause trouble”, it also did not fear trouble, said the commentary by Zhong Sheng, which means “voice of China”, a pen name often used by the newspaper to express its views on foreign policy

“No one should underestimate China’s confidence, will and strength,” it added.

Since the news of Ms Meng’s arrest broke last Thursday, Beijing has repeatedly demanded her immediate release and insisted that Canada has infringed on the lawful, legitimate rights of a Chinese citizen.

The commentaries and editorials in Chinese state media admonished Canada for its treatment of Ms Meng as a dangerous criminal, handcuffing her at the airport and making her wear ankle restraints after her first bail hearing.

Said an editorial in the China Daily: “Meng is a middle-aged woman, who has health issues and is still in recovery from neck surgery in May, yet she is being treated as a violent offender.

“It is hard to escape the conclusion that her treatment is something of a show trial intended to humiliate her and China.”

The English-language state-owned newspaper said the Chinese telecom giant is a “bête noire” for the US as the company is trying to be a global leader of the emerging 5G technology.

“(T)he US administration wants to reserve that spot for US companies,” it added.

The nationalistic Global Times had harsher words for Canada.

The CCP-linked tabloid said: “It does not serve Canada’s national interest if it intends to fawn over the US by treating Ms Meng unjustly.”

The editorial warned that if Ms Meng is refused bail and extradited to the US, “Canada will get minimal gratitude from the US, but maximum opposition from China”.

“Chinese people will take the issue seriously, and will ask the Chinese government to impose severe sanctions on Canada,” it said.

“Canadian public interest will definitely be impaired if Sino-Canadian relations are put at a risk of major retrogression.”



Enjoyed this story? Share it.


About the Author: The Straits Times is Singapore's top-selling newspaper.

Eastern Briefings

All you need to know about Asia


Our Eastern Briefings Newsletter presents curated stories from 22 Asian newspapers from South, Southeast and Northeast Asia.

Sign up and stay updated with the latest news.



By providing us with your email address, you agree to our Privacy Policy and Terms of Service.

View Today's Newsletter Here

Diplomacy

China accuses Canada of double standard

Beijing slams Justin Trudeau’s criticism of drug smuggler’s death sentence. China on Tuesday expressed strong dissatisfaction at the Canadian prime minister’s criticism of a drug smuggler’s death sentence, urging the country to respect China’s judicial sovereignty and stop making irresponsible remarks. Foreign Ministry spokeswoman Hua Chunying told a daily news briefing that drug crimes are recognized worldwide as serious crimes and are extremely harmful to the society. She said all countries severely crack down on the issue and so does China. Remarks made by a “relevant Canadian person” lack the spirit of rule by law, she said, urging the Canadian side to correct the mistakes and stop making irresponsible remarks. Robert Lloyd Schellenberg, a Canadian national convicted of smuggling over 222 kilograms of methamphetamines, was sentenced to death on Monday at


By China Daily
January 16, 2019

Diplomacy

South Korean defense paper doesn’t label north an enemy

Ministry also says the north has specialized battalion for assassination of key figures. The Defense Ministry does not directly refer to North Korea as an enemy and takes a less hostile tone toward the communist state in its 23rd white paper published Tuesday. The ministry’s latest biennial white paper — the first to be published since the Moon Jae-in administration came to power in 2017 — addresses security threats, military policies and the regional security environment. Perhaps most notably, the Defense Ministry eliminated the phrase specifically describing North Korea as South Korea’s “enemy,” a move that appears to reflect


By The Korea Herald
January 16, 2019

Diplomacy

Rohingya issue will not be solved easily

Bangladeshi foreign minister says the road to a solution will be long and paved with difficulty. The much-talked-about Rohingya issue will not be solved easily, Foreign Minister AK Abdul Momen said on Monday. “I have directed to conduct a study on the Rohingyas which will try to find out the impacts of Rohingyas on our country’s social, economic and security system,” said the minister while talking to the journalists at his office in Dhaka. Urging the international community to step forward for a logical solution to the crisis, he said, “The international community has also responsibilities to solve the crisis. If Rohingya crisis is continued, interest of everybody including India and China will be hampered.” India and Russia are much positive over the Rohingya issue right now, the minister informed. About the resistance from several countries including China over the issue, he s


By Daily Star
January 15, 2019

Diplomacy

No breakthrough in South Korea-Japan military talks

Talks stem from a radar incident involving a Japanese aircraft in December. South Korea and Japan have failed to narrow their differences in a stand-off over whether a Korean warship had locked its targeting radar on a Japanese patrol plane last month, Korean news agency Yonhap reported on Tuesday (Jan 15), citing the country’s defence ministry. General-ranked representatives from the two sides met in Singapore on Monday (Jan 14) but could not resolve the dispute, according to the defence ministry. It was the first face-to-face contact between officials from the two nations over the Dec 20 incident, Yonhap said. Tokyo accuses a South Korean warship of locking fire-control radar on its maritime patrol aircraft, and has released a video clip to back up its claim.


By The Straits Times
January 15, 2019

Diplomacy

Huawei to end employment of staff arrested in Poland for spying

Huawei has been accused by countries of spying for Chinese government. Huawei announced on Saturday evening that it would terminate employment of Wang Weijing, who was detained in Poland on suspicion of spying, CCTV reported. Wang’s alleged actions have no relation to the company, according to Huawei. “In accordance with the terms and conditions of Huawei’s labor contract, we have made this decision because the incident in question has brought Huawei into disrepute,” said Huawei. “Huawei complies with all applicable laws and regulations in the countries where it operates, and we require every employee to abide by the laws and regulations in the countries where they are based,” said Huawei.


By China Daily
January 14, 2019

Diplomacy

Kim seeks approval from Xi ahead of North Korea summit

The visit signals China’s importance in the negotiation between the United States and North Korea. North Korean leader Kim Jong-un is heading home from three days of talks with Chinese President Xi Jinping on Wednesday afternoon, according to media outlets from the two countries. The surprise trip was likely undertaken to give the two leaders an opportunity to convene ahead of an expected second summit with US President Donald Trump concerning denuclearization, but many are viewing the visit as a bargaining chip, or insurance policy that both North Korea and China stand to benefit from, and that leaves the United States’ position less secure. Kim’s visit marks the North Korean leader’s


By Quinn Libson
January 11, 2019