See More on Facebook

Culture and society, Current affairs

Indian Army does not want LGBT service members

The Indian army chief said that the Indian Army is not ready to accept homosexuals in its service.


Written by

Updated: January 11, 2019

India’s army chief General Bipin Rawat told reporters on Thursday that the Indian armed forces was not ready to have homosexuals in the service despite a law which decriminalized homosexuality being passed last year.

“For LGBT (lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender) issues, in the Army these are not acceptable,” Rawat told reporters during an annual press briefing.

“We are neither modernised, nor westernised. LGBT issues are not acceptable to us.”

India’s Supreme Court decriminalized gay sex in a unanimous ruling last September prompting massive celebration for the country’s gay community.

The law, known as Section 477 of the criminal code, had existed since the colonial period and similar vestiges of British rule exist throughout South and Southeast Asia.

The law banned all deviant sex acts “against the order of nature.”

India’s LGBT’s community had campaigned for over two decades to have the law repealed.

The law was repealed once in 2009 before being reinstated in 2013 after a challenge from a local astrologer who said gay sex would erode traditional marriage and society.

The supreme court’s ruling in September galvanized LGBT communities across Southeast Asia, many saying they too would mount campaign against the British-rule era laws.

Rawat’s statement on Thursday is likely to draw controversy according to the Statesman newspaper. Many say it was a litmus test for acceptance of homosexuality within Indian society.

 

 

 

 

 



Enjoyed this story? Share it.


Cod Satrusayang
About the Author: Cod Satrusayang is the Managing Editor at Asia News Network.

Eastern Briefings

All you need to know about Asia


Our Eastern Briefings Newsletter presents curated stories from 22 Asian newspapers from South, Southeast and Northeast Asia.

Sign up and stay updated with the latest news.



By providing us with your email address, you agree to our Privacy Policy and Terms of Service.

View Today's Newsletter Here

Culture and society, Current affairs

MH17 probe releases new phone calls linking suspects to top Russians

With contributions by AFP. A Dutch-led probe into the shooting-down of flight MH17 over Ukraine in 2014 released new intercepted phone calls on Thursday (Nov 14) between high-ranking Russian officials and suspects facing trial over the crash. Investigators said they were making a “new witness appeal” based on “recorded telephone calls between the leaders of the DPR (Donetsk People’s Republic, a separatist group) and high-ranking Russian officials.” “Ties between Russian officials and DPR leaders appear to have been much closer” than originally believed, Mr Andy Kraag, the head of Dutch police’s Criminal Investigations Division, said in a video statement. Investigators said in June that they were going to put three Rus


By Cod Satrusayang
November 15, 2019

Culture and society, Current affairs

Bangladesh charges 25 in student’s death

‘They sought to strike terror into students’. The accused in Buet student Abrar Fahad murder case had turned so rowdy that they often tortured general students to establish a reign of terror on the campus. Their efforts to create terror resulted in Abrar killing, DMP Additional Commissioner Monirul Islam said as police pressed charges against 25 Buet students, mostly leaders and activists of the university’s BCL unit, in the case yesterday. The move came 37 days after Abrar, a second year student of electrical


By Daily Star
November 14, 2019

Culture and society, Current affairs

Five years later, prosecutorial probe kicks off into Sewol ferry sinking

For some families, it is too little, too late. The Supreme Prosecutors’ Office on Monday launched a special investigation unit to probe allegations surrounding the sinking of the Sewol ferry in 2014. During a press briefing at the Seoul Central District Prosecutors’ Office, the unit said it is “committed to making its probe so thorough that it will be the last one to be conducted into the Sewol sinking.” The unit will take on investigations conducted by a provisional state commission formed in January 2015 with a fact-finding mission on the Sewol case. This is the prosecution’s first organized effort concerning the disaster from over five years ago. On April 16, 2014, the 6,825-ton ferry with a passenger capacity of 921 sank off the coast of South Jeolla Province en route to Jeju Island, killing over 300 people, mostly children. The 18-member prosecution unit is headed by


By The Korea Herald
November 12, 2019

Culture and society, Current affairs

Ayodhya verdict is silent on why Muslims must prove exclusive possession of site

The Indian court has deprived Muslims of the disputed plot because they couldn’t show exclusive possession before 1857. On page 215 of the Ayodhya-Babri Masjid verdict, delivered by a five-judge bench on Saturday, the Supreme Court makes a crucial statement of logic: “It is true that in matters of faith and belief, the absence of evidence may not be evidence of absence.” But in its final findings, the court contradicted this same logic. The crux of the judgment that India has awaited since 1949 is that Muslims failed to show unimpeded possession of the disputed site in Ayodhya between 1528, when the mosque was supposedly built by Mughal emperor Babur, and 1857, when, after a clash between Muslims and Hindus, a railing was erected between the inner and outer courtyards at the disputed site. The inner courtyard is where the mosque demolished by Hindutva mobs in 1992 stood. The outer courtyard has se


By Dawn
November 12, 2019

Culture and society, Current affairs

The government has undermined education

A core value for a country to develop, the federal govenrment must make amends. The High-Level National Education Commission was formed in 2018 to recommend steps to better the country’s education system. After much criticism regarding the secrecy surrounding the findings of the commission, the Education Ministry finally, made public portions of the new education policy. But it seems all is still not well. Analysts and commission members were quick to point out that the new policy has disregarded almost all of the commission’s recommendations, mainly the part where private schools were required to be transformed from ‘for-profit’ to ‘not-for-profit’. Findings of the commission are important documents that ne


By The Kathmandu Post
November 11, 2019

Culture and society, Current affairs

Egypt backs China’s quest to repatriate its artifacts

Egypt has brought back artifacts from western museums under the current government. Egypt’s minister for antiquities said his country supports China’s efforts to repatriate its historical artifacts from around the world, as countries with a rich cultural heritage have a duty to future generations to safeguard these items for their own people and humanity as a whole. Khaled El-Enany spoke to China Daily at the launch of the exhibition Tutankhamun: Treasures of the Golden Pharaoh, which opened on Saturday and will run at London’s Saatchi Gallery until May 3. The exhibition coincides with the 97th anniversary of the discovery of the tomb on Nov 4, 1922, by an expedition led by British historian Howard Carter.


By China Daily
November 6, 2019