See More on Facebook

Curiosity, Current affairs

Muscular solid-fuel rocket to fly soon

The rocket will be used for space exploration.


Written by

Updated: March 14, 2019

China Aerospace Science and Industry Corp will soon launch the nation’s biggest solid-propellant carrier rocket and is working on new models that will be even larger and stronger, a project insider said.

Hu Shengyun, a senior rocket designer at the CASIC Fourth Academy in Wuhan, Hubei province, which develops and builds the Kuaizhou series, said the maiden mission of the Kuaizhou 11 will take place soon at the Jiuquan Satellite Launch Center in northwestern China.

He spoke to China Daily on the sidelines of the ongoing second session of the 13th National People’s Congress in Beijing as he attends the national legislature’s annual meeting.

The researcher said the Kuaizhou 11 is China’s largest and most powerful solid-propellant carrier rocket, with a length of 25 meters, a diameter of 2.2 meters, and a liftoff weight of 78 metric tons. It is able to place a 1-metric-ton payload into a sun-synchronous orbit at an altitude of 700 kilometers, or a 1.5-ton payload into a low-Earth orbit.

Before it, the biggest solid-fuel civilian rocket in China was the Long March 11, with a length of 20.8 m, a diameter of 2 m and a liftoff weight of 58 tons.

Information previously published by CASIC said the rocket that will fly first is to carry six satellites.

While preparation for the Kuaizhou 11 mission is underway, designers at the Wuhan academy have begun to develop two new solid-propellant rockets of bigger size and carrying capacity-Kuaizhou 16 and 21-said Hu, the rocket designer.

The Kuaizhou 16 will have a diameter of 3.5 meters and be able to place a 4-ton payload in low-Earth orbit. The Kuaizhou 21 will be bigger-with a diameter of 4.5 meters-and will also be mightier, able to send a 20-ton spacecraft to low-Earth orbit, power similar to the United States’ Falcon 9 Full Thrust, Hu said.

Hu said the two new models are likely to conduct their first mission in about five years if all goes well. Like other Kuaizhou types, they will be mainly tasked with meeting demands in commercial launch service from the burgeoning satellite industry in China.

Meanwhile, designers also hope the Kuaizhou 21 will have the opportunity to serve government space programs such as the space station program, he added.

Zhang Di, a vice-president at the academy, previously told China Daily that the Kuaizhou 21 will be powerful enough to transport supplies to the country’s future space station or to ferry robotic probes to planets far from Earth.

CASIC began to develop the Kuaizhou series in 2009 as a low-cost, quick-response product for the commercial space market. The company has launched four: two Kuaizhou 1s and two Kuaizhou 1As.



Enjoyed this story? Share it.


China Daily
About the Author: China Daily covers domestic and world news through nine print editions and digital media worldwide.

Eastern Briefings

All you need to know about Asia


Our Eastern Briefings Newsletter presents curated stories from 22 Asian newspapers from South, Southeast and Northeast Asia.

Sign up and stay updated with the latest news.



By providing us with your email address, you agree to our Privacy Policy and Terms of Service.

View Today's Newsletter Here

Curiosity, Current affairs

Indonesian pre-teen writes to Trump

Why do you always export your waste to my country. A surge of waste imports into cities in East Java has prompted a teenager to write to United States President Donald Trump to protest about the incoming trash. Aeshnina Azzahra, a 12-year-old from Gresik, East Java, wrote that the river in her neighborhood was “very dirty and smelly” as many factories dispose of their waste carelessly on land and water. She said she had to write to Trump because the US was among the largest exporters of waste to Indonesia. “Why do you always export your waste to my country? Why don’t you take care of your own waste,” she wrote in her letter. Aeshnina also participated in a protest held by environmentalists in front of the United States Consulate General in Surabaya, East Java, on Friday. She said America’s waste had also polluted Indonesia’s oceans and consumed by


By The Jakarta Post
July 15, 2019

Curiosity, Current affairs

Satellites making stars harder to study

The announcement was made by Japan’s national observatory. The National Astronomical Observatory of Japan has expressed concern that satellites orbiting the Earth are having a negative impact on astronomical observations. In a statement released Tuesday, the observatory called on satellite-related businesses to consider the impact of their actions and to take appropriate countermeasures. The NAOJ said the hundreds of satellites currently in operation are starting to hinder astronomical observations, such as by reflecting the rays of the sun and when the radio waves they emit get mixed up with those from heavenly bodies. The issue gained prominence when a U.S. observatory photographed numerous light rays from 60 communications satellites launched in May by Space Exploration Technologies Corp. of the United States.


By The Japan News
July 11, 2019

Curiosity, Current affairs

Four foreign militants detained in Malaysia

Militants detained as part of an anti-terror sweep. Four foreign militants were detained following anti-terror swoops in Selangor and Kedah, says Inspector Abdul Hamid Bador. The Inspector-General of Police said the four – two Myanmar nationals, a Filipino and an Indian national – were picked up by the Bukit Aman Special Branch Counter Terrorism Division (E8) between June 14 and July 3. Abdul Hamid said the first arrest was on June 14 in Klang where a 54-year-old Filipino man was detained. “The electrician was detained as he has relations with the Abu Sayyaf terror group. “He is also involved in assisting the kidnapping for ransom activities in Sabah waters. He was also listed as wanted by the Eastern Sabah Security Command,” he said. He added that the suspect used forged identification documents. The co


By The Star
July 10, 2019

Curiosity, Current affairs

Amnesty International responds to Duterte’s government

The rights organization tells government spokesman Panelo: Do your homework. Amnesty International fired back at presidential spokesperson Salvador Panelo on Tuesday, a day after he accused the human rights monitor of politicizing the thousands of killings in President Rodrigo Duterte’s brutal war on drugs. “We suggest next time before the honorable presidential spokesperson makes a response, he should at least do his homework first by reading our report,” said Butch Olano, Amnesty Philippines section director. “Accusing Amnesty International of politicizing the issue of extrajudicial executions is just another way of muddling the Duterte administration’s accountability and its complicity in the gravity of this problem,” Olano said. Template Panelo on Monday slammed the London-based human rights group as “incorrigible” for insisting on a United Nations pro


By Philippine Daily Inquirer
July 10, 2019

Curiosity, Current affairs

Anti-extradition protest in Hong Kong ends peacefully

The protests ended at West Kowloon station that connects city to mainland. An anti-extradition protest march on Sunday (July 7) ended peacefully at West Kowloon station, after thousands of protesters set off from Salisbury Garden and marched through the busy Tsim Sha Tsui area in an attempt to take their message directly to visitors from mainland China. The protesters were orderly and the mood was calm as the march began. Unlike previous demonstrations, where the dissatisfaction had been aimed at the Hong Kong government, Sunday’s protest march set its sights on the mainland and mainland Chinese visitors. The protest’s organisers said 230,000 people took part, while the police said there were 56,000 people at the peak of the protest. The march began at Salisbury Garden at about 3.40pm, with protesters marching through Tsim Sha Tsui – Hong Kong’s busy tourist district R


By The Straits Times
July 7, 2019

Curiosity, Current affairs

Wolf of Wall Street producer arrested in Malaysia

The producer is charged in connection to the corrupt 1mdb fund. Hollywood film producer Riza Shahriz Abdul Aziz will be the third member of former Prime Minister Najib Razak’s family to be hauled to court by the Malaysian Anti-Corruption Commis­sion (MACC). The stepson of the former prime minister will be charged under the Anti-Money Laundering, Anti-Terror­ism Financing and Proceeds from Unlawful Activities Act (Amla) 2001. Riza’s mother Rosmah Mansor is also on trial on graft charges along with Najib, who is facing multiple charges of corruption, abuse of power and money laundering. MACC chief commissioner Latheefa Koya said Riza was arrested at noon yesterday and later released on bail. “He has to appear in court to face charges under Amla,” she said. Riza, a known associate of fugitive businessman Low Taek Jho or Jho Low, is expected to face several money laundering ch


By The Star
July 5, 2019