See More on Facebook

Culture and society, Current affairs

The Pakistani victims of the New Zealand terror attacks

Remembering the Pakistani victims of the terror attacks.


Written by

Updated: March 18, 2019

Nine Pakistanis were among the 49 victims of a terror attackon two mosques that rattled the otherwise serene New Zealand city of Christchurch on Friday.

Six of the deaths were confirmed on Saturday while three more were confirmed on Sunday.

Below is a compilation of all the facts so far known about the nine Pakistani victims:

Naeem Rashid

Naeem Rashid. — Facebook

Naeem Rashid, 50-years-old, was identified by a relative from the video live-streamed by the attacker. He had attempted to stop the assailant as he gunned down victims in the mosque. He succumbed to his injuries at Christchurch hospital, according to New Zealand Herald.

Rashid, a banker by profession, went to New Zealand in 2009 for further studies. He earned a post-doctorate degree and worked as a teacher there. His wife is also a teacher at a local institute.

He was the first cousin of Ex-MPA Amna Sardar and nephew of Dr Saleem Afzal, the former medical director of Ayub Medical Complex.

“Pakistan is proud of Mian Naeem Rashid who was martyred trying to tackle the White Supremacist terrorist and his courage will be recognised with a national award,” said Prime Minister Khan.

While speaking to Dawn at the family’s residence in Jinnahabad in Abbottabad, Rashid’s relatives spoke of how brave and loving a man he was. They described him as a person of “humble nature, who always remained active to help the oppressed”.

The relatives fondly recalled his frequent visits to Pakistan and how he had always strived to play a role for the well-being of the general public.

His brother Khurshid Alam told BBC that he was proud of Rashid’s actions after seeing the video. “He was a brave person, and I’ve heard from a few people there, there were few witnesses… they’ve said he saved a few lives there by trying to stop that guy.”

“It’s a still a shock for us, whatever hero he becomes … it’s our pride now, but still the loss. It’s like cutting your limb off,” Alam added.

Rashid, along with his eldest son Talha Naeem who also died in the attack, will both be buried in Christchurch. Another one of his sons is being treated for injuries, BBC reported.

According to AP Rashid’s brother, who lives in Abbottabad, received an emotional call from his sister-in-law telling him of his brother’s death.

Khurshid said his brother had already bought his plane ticket to Pakistan for a May family reunion.

“He was very brave. He snatched the gun and I think he saved many lives,” Khurshid said.

Rashid’s 75-year-old mother Bedar Bibi was devastated and wanted to fly to New Zealand for a last look at her son and grandson.

“I want the New Zealand government should take me there so I can have one last look of my beloved son and my grandson Talha,” she said.

Read more: Mother seeks visa to attend funeral in Christchurch

Talha Naeem

In this picture taken on March 16, a relative looks at a picture on a mobile phone of Talha Naeem in Abbottabad. — AFP

21-year-old Talha Naeem, the eldest son of Naeem Rashid, had recently completed a degree programme in engineering.

According to BBC, he was 11 when the family moved to New Zealand.

Talha’s friends said he had just landed a new job and was hopeful he would get married soon.

“A few days ago when I spoke to Naeem, he told me about his plans to come to Pakistan and get his son married,” said Talha’s uncle in Lahore. “But now we are making arrangements to bring the dead bodies of both father and son back to Pakistan.”

Jahandad Ali

Jahandad Ali’s wife, Amna Ali, along with their three children are currently in Lahore for a visit, DawnNewsTV reported, where he had left them to spend some time with his in-laws. He was due to take them back to New Zealand on March 23, where he had been living for the past five years.

Jahandad Ali. — Facebook
Jahandad Ali. — Facebook

NZ Herald reported that Amna had last spoken to him on Friday morning while she was having breakfast.

According to Stuff, one of Ali’s colleagues told Amna that they had left work at 1pm to head to Al Noor Mosque for Friday prayers.

Until Saturday’s notification released by the Ministry of Foreign Affairs, she had not received any word regarding his status. Any friends or known associates she spoke to, had no information regarding his whereabouts.

Ali was 34-years-old.

Dr Haroon Mahmood

Dr Haroon Mahmood, 40-years-old, was a resident of Rawalpindi.

According to the NZ Herald he leaves behind his wife and two children, aged 13 and 11-years-old.

NZ Herald reported that Dr Mahmood had a doctorate and had been working as an assistant academic director at Canterbury College — a private higher education institute, which offers English Language and Business programmes for study.

Dr Haroon Mahmood. — LinkedIn

Dr Mahmood’s LinkedIn profile shows that he earned a Master of Business Administration (MBA) as well as a Master of Science degree in finance from Shaheed Zulfikar Ali Bhutto Institute of Science and Technology from 2002-2004 and 2005-2007 respectively.

From 2004 to 2012, he worked for several local banks. From 2014-16, he was a teaching assistant for economics and statistics at Lincoln University. A post on Facebook by the university recognised his submission of his doctoral thesis on “maturity transformation risk, profitability and stability in Islamic banking” when he handed it in in July, 2018.

He was also a lecturer at Linguis International in Christchurch where he taught business from 2014 until April, 2017. A month later, he joined Canterbury College where he had been working as an academic supervisor.

Syed Areeb Ahmed

A relative shows the picture of Syed Areeb Ahmed on his cell phone outside his home in Karachi on Saturday. — AP

Syed Areeb Ahmed, 26-years-old, had recently moved from Karachi for a new job in New Zealand to help support his family back home.

One of his uncles, Muhammad Muzaffar Khan, described him as deeply religious, praying five times a day. But education was always his first priority, Khan said.

“He had done chartered accountancy from Pakistan. He was the only son to his parents. He had only one younger sister … He had only started his career, but the enemies took his life.”

Family members, relatives, and friends gathered at Ahmed’s house to express their condolences. His body is expected to arrive there in the coming days.

Sohail Shahid

Sohail Shahid was the son of Muhammad Shabbir. He was 40-years-old. Further details are awaited about the deceased.

Zeeshan Raza, Ghulam Hussain and Karam bibi

On Sunday, the Foreign Office (FO) confirmed the deaths of Zeeshan Raza, his father Ghulam Hussain and mother Karam Bibi. Details and photos are awaited of the three deceased.



Enjoyed this story? Share it.


Dawn
About the Author: Dawn is Pakistan's oldest and most widely read English-language newspaper.

Eastern Briefings

All you need to know about Asia


Our Eastern Briefings Newsletter presents curated stories from 22 Asian newspapers from South, Southeast and Northeast Asia.

Sign up and stay updated with the latest news.



By providing us with your email address, you agree to our Privacy Policy and Terms of Service.

View Today's Newsletter Here

Culture and society, Current affairs

Modi defends citizenship decision

PM Modi says it has nothing to do with Indian Muslims. Prime Minister Narendra Modi said, that unity in diversity is integral to India while addressing ‘Aabhar Rally’ at Delhi’s Ramlila Maidan today to kick start Bharatiya Janata Party’s Delhi Assembly Elections campaign slated for early next year, amid protests in Delhi and all over the country against the contentious Citizenship Act and the National Register of Citizenship(NRC). Modi raised slogan of ‘vividhta me ekta, Bharat ki visheshta’ (Unity in diversity is India’s speciality). PM Modi while giving his party and government’s view on CAA and NRC said, “Muslims being misled, I have always ensured that documents will never come in way of development schemes and their beneficiaries.” Citizenship law and NRC have nothing to do with Indian Muslims or with Indian citizens, he clarified. “We have never asked


By The Statesman
December 23, 2019

Culture and society, Current affairs

The Chinese version

Muhammad Amir Rana asks what is the Chinese version of Islam.  TENSIONS between China and the US have escalated after the House of Representative’s Uighur Human Rights Policy Act, 2019. The move is of a piece with the allegations of many international media and human rights organisations that China is persecuting the Uighur community and violating their rights — allegations that Beijing has denied. Calling the US action a political move aimed at damaging its international image, China says it is running a deradicalisation programme to mainstream its communities. Read: Amid global outcry, China defends internment camps of minorities in Xinjiang The Chinese claim has not been verified by independent sources and mystery shrouds its deradicalisation or re-education programme. China needs to demonstra


By Dawn
December 16, 2019

Culture and society, Current affairs

India under Modi is moving systematically with a supremacist agenda, says PM Imran

Imran Khan made the comments after India passed a controversial citizenship requirement. Prime Minister Imran Khan said on Thursday that India, under Prime Minister Narendra Modi, has been moving systematically with a Hindu supremacist agenda. The prime minister was referencing the controversial Citizenship Amendment Bill passed by India’s upper house amid protests on Wednesday. The bill will let the Indian government grant citizenship to millions of illegal immigrants who entered India from three neighbouring countries before 2015 — but not if they are Muslim. Modi’s government — re-elected in May and under pressure over a slowing economy — says Muslims from Afghanistan, Bangladesh and Pakistan are excluded from the legislation because they do not face discrimination in those countries. Taking to Twitter, Prime Minister I


By Dawn
December 13, 2019

Culture and society, Current affairs

Nepal moves up in Human Development Index but still lags behind in South Asia

Nepal’s human development index of 0,579 indicates that people are living longer, are more educated and have greater incomes, according to the Human Development Report. Despite global progress in tackling poverty, hunger and disease, a ‘new generation of inequalities’ indicates that many societies are not working as they should and Nepal is not an exception, according to a new human development report released on Tuesday. The old inequalities were based on access to health services and education whereas the new generation of inequalities is based on technology, education and the climate, according to the United Nations Development Programme’s Human Development Report. “Previously, we talked about wealth as a major driver for inequality. Now, countries like Nepal are in another inequality trap and that concerns


By The Kathmandu Post
December 12, 2019

Culture and society, Current affairs

Taiwan among top 10 study destinations for U.S. students

Thailand and Singapore among other Asian destinations. China welcomed the highest number of U.S. students last year, followed by Japan and India in second and third places, respectively, according to a recent survey about exchange students in Asia. South Korea, Thailand, Hong Kong, Vietnam, Singapore, Taiwan, and Indonesia rounded up the top 10 list of the most popular Asian countries among U.S. students. According to AsiaExchange, “The high level of education, low exposure to crime, economic freedom and good healthcare system are a few examples of why Taiwan is ranked 2nd on the annual Global Peace Index.” It’s also very safe to live in Taiwan, as crime rates are low, the Website stressed, noting that Taiwan’s focus on human rights, gender equality and freedom of speech has made it a top destination for education. Taiwan, whose institutions are strong and reliable, has remained la


By Cod Satrusayang
December 12, 2019

Culture and society, Current affairs

SAARC turns 35 but has very little to show for its age

The regional bloc of seven South Asian countries and Afghanistan has largely been held hostage to the rivalry between India and Pakistan, say analysts. The South Asian Association for Regional Cooperation might have turned 35 but its three-and-a-half decades of existence has largely failed to advance its own central tenet—regional cooperation. As SAARC marked its 35th anniversary with a flurry of congratulatory messages from heads of government, expressing their commitment to regional cooperation, many analysts and diplomats wonder if these promises will ever translate into action. The regional association has failed to hold its 19th summit, ever since 2016 when India sud


By The Kathmandu Post
December 9, 2019