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Two most wanted apprehended in Sri Lanka

Men were wanted in connection to the terrorist attacks earlier this month.


Written by

Updated: April 29, 2019

The Nawalapitiya police, yesterday, arrested two of the six most wanted suspects in connection with the Easter Sunday bombings. Police headquarters spokesman SP Ruwan Gunasekera identified the arrested persons as Mohamed Iyuhaim Sadik Abdul Haq and Mohamed Iyuham Shaheed Abdul Haq.

They were handed over to the Criminal Investigation Department (CID) for further investigations.

The Directorate of Military Intelligence (DMI), too, has sought access to the suspects.

They were among six persons, including three women wanted by the CID in connection with the coordinated attacks carried out by ex- members of the National Thowheed Jamaath (NTJ) and the Jamiathul Millathu Ibrahim (JMI).

Brig. Chula Kodituwakku, Director of the Directorate of Military Intelligence (DMI) last Friday (April 26) told a special briefing, chaired by President Maithripala Sirisena, at the President’s House, the attackers were breakaway members of the NTJ and JMI.

The CID, last Thursday, sought public assistance to track down six suspects in connection with the Easter Sunday massacre probe.

Authoritative sources said that countrywide operations were continuing with security forces deployed in support of law enforcement authorities. During past 24 hours ending at 6 am yesterday, about 48 persons had been apprehended and detained pending investigations.

The suspects taken in since the April 21 attacks are detained under the Prevention of Terrorism Act (PTA).

The government, on Saturday night, announced the proscription of NTJ and JMI under Emergency declared in the aftermath of the Easter Sunday suicide attacks.

Among those arrested in connection with possible links to terror networks were Colombo Municipal Council member Noordeen Mohamed Thajudeen, representing the Colombo Central, Deputy Mayor of Negombo Mohamed Ansar and one-time driver of the Easter Sunday terror mastermind Zahran Hashim, who is believed to have died in suicide attack on Colombo Shangri-La along with another suicide cadre.

Sources said that foreign investigators including the FBI were assisting in investigations.



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The Island
About the Author: Established in 1981, The Island is an English-language daily newspaper published in Sri Lanka.

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