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Police impose curfew in Sri Lanka after anti-Muslim violence

The violence are seen as reprisal for terrorist attacks carried out last month by Islamist extremists.


Written by

Updated: May 14, 2019

A Police curfew was imposed last night throughout the country until 4.00 am today to prevent the spread of violence that erupted in Kuliyapitiya on Sunday night after angry mobs set prayer centres and shops owned by Muslims on fire in the latest fallout from the Easter bombings.

An extremist political group was behind yesterday’s riots at Hettipola that lead to the destruction of several Muslim owned shops and houses, a senior police officer from Kurunegala told The Island.

Although no one was hurt during the riots there was property damage, which was being assessed, he said.

A number of youth in the area were roused into violence by an extremist group. Police had to impose curfew until 4 am today and called in riot squads and STF units to bolster security.

“They were travelling on motorcycles and in three wheelers and attacking Muslim owned properties. They were not heeding police warning. Therefore we had to impose a curfew at around 2 pm and call for back up.”

The police were attempting to gather religious leaders of the area in a bid to calm the crowds.

The government banned Facebook, WhatsApp and other social media platforms yesterday following anti-Muslim riots in Kuliyapitiya, Bingiriya, and Dummalasuriya.

An AFP dispatch said: Christian groups attacked Muslim-owned shops in a sign of the ongoing religious tension in Sri Lanka since the April 21 attacks by jihadist suicide bombers on three hotels and three churches which left 258 dead.

A night curfew in several towns north of Colombo was lifted at dawn, but reimposed 10 hours later as tensions were fuelled by persistent rumours of mob violence.

Police said a Catholic priest had sent out a message to parishioners about possible attacks, causing panic among some people in violence-prone areas.

Prime Minister Ranil Wickremesinghe urged the public not to believe rumours and warned that civil unrest would only stretch the already thinly deployed security forces.

“I appeal to all citizens to remain calm and not be swayed by false information,” Wickremesinghe said on Twitter, which was not targeted in the social media blockade.

“Security forces are working tirelessly to apprehend terrorists and ensure the security of the country, but each time there is civil unrest, we increase their burden and hamper ongoing investigations.”

A state of emergency has been in place since the bombings – which the Islamic State group claims to have helped – and security forces have been given sweeping powers to arrest and detain suspects for long periods.

Police said a mob targeted shops in the northwestern town of Chilaw on Sunday in anger at a Facebook post by a shopkeeper. Security forces fired into the air to disperse the crowd, but the violence spread to nearby towns where Muslim businesses were also attacked.

A motorcycle gang attacked shops in nearby Kuliyapitiya and four members were arrested, officials said.

However, dozens of people laid siege to the police station and forced their release.

Despite a night curfew, a mosque was vandalised, local residents said.

“Don’t laugh more, 1 day u will cry,” was posted on Facebook by a Muslim shopkeeper, and local Christians took it to be a warning of an impending attack.

Mobs smashed the man’s shop and vandalised a nearby mosque prompting security forces to fire in the air to disperse the crowd. A curfew was imposed from Sunday afternoon until dawn Monday.

There have already been clashes between Christians and Muslims in Negombo, the town north of Colombo that was targeted by the suicide attackers.

The main body of Islamic clerics, the All Ceylon Jamiyyathul Ulama (ACJU), said there was increased suspicion of Muslims after the Easter Sunday attacks.

“We call upon the members of the Muslim communities to be more patient and guard your actions and avoid unnecessary postings or hosting on social media,” the ACJU said.

Internet service providers said they had been instructed by the telecommunications regulator to block access to Facebook, WhatsApp, YouTube and Instagram.

The latest unrest came as Catholic churches resumed public Sunday masses for the first time since the bombings.

Worshippers were searched before being allowed into churches that were guarded by armed police and troops. There were no reports of disruption to services, however.

Dozens of people have been detained since the Easter Sunday attacks, and amid the heightened security, police have banned parking near schools and students are allowed in after checking for explosives.

Public schools completed their reopening from extended Easter holidays after the attacks, but attendance was extremely low, according to education authorities.

Private Catholic schools were to open on Tuesday, but many were planning to postpone the reopening until next week, parent groups said.

Muslims make up around 10 percent of Buddhist-majority Sri Lanka’s 21 million population and Christians about 7.6 percent.

 



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The Island
About the Author: Established in 1981, The Island is an English-language daily newspaper published in Sri Lanka.

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