See More on Facebook

Business, Economics

China, US top trade negotiators to meet in Shanghai

The two sides have not met since Trump and Xi met at the G20 summit.


Written by

Updated: July 26, 2019

Top Chinese and United States negotiators will hold the 12th round of economic and trade talks in Shanghai during July 30-31, the Ministry of Commerce said on Thursday.

The meetings scheduled for next week will be the first face-to-face discussions between the two sides since their leaders met at the G20 summit in Japan last month.

Gao Feng, the ministry’s spokesman, said that holding negotiations in different places is normal.

“Shanghai has good conditions for conducting consultations,” Gao said, without elaborating.

ALSO READ: Trade talks restart gives financial market reasons to be cheerful

US Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin and Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer will meet with Chinese Vice-Premier Liu He to continue negotiations aimed at improving the bilateral trade relationship, the White House said in a statement on Wednesday.

Analysts said they hope that China and the United States will iron out their differences and deliver a win-win outcome as top negotiators from both nations resumed trade talks on Tuesday.

Yan Jinming, executive dean of National Academy of Development and Strategy at Renmin University of China, said the consensus reached between the two countries’ leaders set a positive tone for future high-level economic and trade talks.

“I hope China and the US will properly solve their differences and conflicts about the trade issue, cooperate with each other and seek win-win results, so as to enhance the well-being of people from both countries and the rest of the world,” Yan said.

Diao Daming, associate professor at Renmin University of China’s School of International Studies, said the essence of China-US trade friction is competition between huge economies.

“The China-US high-level economic and trade consultations have been resumed. The main goal of the talks is to stabilize bilateral relations through ad hoc mechanisms and set an example for solving potential problems in the future,” Diao said.

China and the US, after their leaders’ meeting in Osaka, are seeking to advance their talks, which stalled in May, and to end the costly trade war, analysts said.

The two countries have exchanged tariffs on billions of dollars of each other’s imports, while Washington had tightened its restrictions on many Chinese companies.

In addition to resumption of phone talks, there was an another positive sign as the Office of US Trade Representive said on Tuesday it will temporarily exempt 110 Chinese products, from medical equipment to key capacitors, from 25 percent tariffs imposed last July, Reuters reported.

Also, US Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross said the US government will issue licenses to US companies seeking to sell products to Huawei Technologies Co when there is no threat to national security, according to a statement released on the department’s website on Tuesday.

But Huawei remains on the Entity List of companies that are deemed to pose a threat to the US, and the announcement does not change the scope of items requiring licenses from the US Department of Commerce nor the presumption of denial, Ross added.

Huawei was put on the Entity List in May and was banned from buying technologies originating in the US without special government approval.

Lyu Tingjie, a telecommunications professor at Beijing University of Posts and Telecommunications, said the Commerce Department failed to specify which products will continue to be restricted from being sold to Huawei. Lyu said such an opaque statement will only add costs and pressure to US suppliers of Huawei.

“The US government seems to show a gesture by relaxing the ban on Huawei, but it declined to remove the Chinese tech company from the blacklist. It is more like playing a negotiating game,” Lyu said.

Fabiana Fedeli, global head of fundamental equities at Robeco Institutional Asset Management BV, based in Rotterdam, Netherlands, said the statement that US companies could continue to sell certain products to Huawei is a positive sign, but “it could easily be retracted or not followed by a more comprehensive agreement”.

“I also continue to be very worried about supply chains, particularly in the information technology area. Companies will not only have to incur investments and costs to transfer their supply chains outside of China, but this will (also) imply the likely fragmentation of such chains, for there is hardly any other country such as China that can currently offer the same level of availability of workers and infrastructure,” Fedeli said.



Enjoyed this story? Share it.


China Daily
About the Author: China Daily covers domestic and world news through nine print editions and digital media worldwide.

Eastern Briefings

All you need to know about Asia


Our Eastern Briefings Newsletter presents curated stories from 22 Asian newspapers from South, Southeast and Northeast Asia.

Sign up and stay updated with the latest news.



By providing us with your email address, you agree to our Privacy Policy and Terms of Service.

View Today's Newsletter Here

Business, Economics

Aung San Suu Kyi denies genocidal intent on Rohingya

She urges world court to let Myanmar justice system work. Denying that Myanmar had genocidal intent in its treatment of the Rohingya people, its de facto leader Aung San Suu Kyi on Wednesday (Dec 11) urged the International Court of Justice in The Hague to let her country’s justice system run its course. “Can there be genocidal intent on the part of a state that actively investigates, prosecutes and punishes soldiers and officers who are accused of wrongdoing?” she asked at the world court, while presenting her opening statement on the second day of public hearings related to Gambia’s lawsuit alleging that Myanmar had breached the 1948 Convention on the Prevention and Punishment of the Crime of Genocide. Carefully avoiding the word “Rohingya”, Ms Suu Kyi said Gambia has given “an incomplete and misleading factual picture”. She referred in her half-


By The Straits Times
December 12, 2019

Business, Economics

Report: US officials lied about Afghanistan

Civilian, military officials misled public for nearly two decades about status of war, Washington Post review of documents finds. For nearly two decades, senior US civilian and military officials didn’t tell the truth about the war in Afghanistan, The Washington Post reported on Monday after reviewing more than 2,000 pages of government documents. The officials made pronouncements they knew to be false and hid evidence that the war had become unwinnable, the newspaper said interviews with those officials show. John Sopko, the head of the federal agency that conducted the interviews, acknowledged to the Post that the documents show “the American people have constantly been lied to”. The newspaper said that two major claims in the documents are that US officials manipulated statistics to suggest to the American public that the war was being won and that successive


By China Daily
December 11, 2019

Business, Economics

Arguments strong enough to convince judges: expert

Myanmar at The Hague for genocide. The arguments presented by the Gambia’s lawyers at the top UN court yesterday were extremely strong and should convince the judges to issue “provisional measures” against Myanmar to stop genocide against the Rohingyas, said a legal expert. If the International Court of Justice (ICJ) issues such an order, Myanmar will be under real pressure as it is a binding one, said the expert. “It was truly convincing the way the lawyers, who are very reputed in their fields, presented their arguments at the top UN court in the Hague,” Ahmed Ziauddin, a genocide researcher based in Brussels, told this correspondent yesterday. “They made it very clear that provisional measures were urgent to protect the Rohingyas, and such measures won’t affect Myanmar as a state.” The ICJ is not a criminal court that can issue an arrest order against any individual. But


By Daily Star
December 11, 2019

Business, Economics

Trump warns N Korea could lose ‘everything’ with hostile acts

Clear warning to Kim regime to refrain from provocations such as nuclear and missile tests. WASHINGTON — US President Donald Trump said Sunday that North Korean leader Kim Jong-un could lose “everything” if he acts in a hostile manner, sending a clear warning to the regime to refrain from provocations such as nuclear and missile tests. Trump sent the tweet as the two countries have exchanged heated rhetoric over their stalled negotiations on dismantling Pyongyang’s nuclear weapons program. Earlier Sunday, North Korea said it had conducted an unexplained “very important test” at its Dongchang-ri satellite launching site, prompting speculation of preparations for a new long-range missile test. But the US president also signaled his commitment to continuing diplomacy with Kim, saying the North Korean leader is “too smart” to be rash. “Kim


By The Korea Herald
December 9, 2019

Business, Economics

7 of 10 Filipinos worried by presence of Chinese workers

China has increased its presence in the archipelago. The rising presence of Chinese workers in the country worry seven out of 10 adult Filipinos, according to the latest Social Weather Stations (SWS) survey, as the government recently launched a crackdown against Philippine offshore gaming operators (Pogos) which mostly employ Chinese nationals. The noncommissioned survey, conducted from Sept. 27 to 30, found that 31 percent “worried a great deal,” while 39 percent are “somewhat worried.” Highest in Metro Manila The proportion of those who were worried about the increasing number of Chinese workers in the country was highest in Metro Manila at 75 percent, followed by the Visayas at 71 percent, Luzon outside Metro Manila (69 percent) and Mindanao (67 percent.) About half of the respondents agree that the rising number of Chinese workers is a threat to national secur


By Philippine Daily Inquirer
December 6, 2019

Business, Economics

Pakistan to launch Digital Pakistan Vision

Imran hopes to unleash ‘potential of youth and women’ with new venture. Prime Minister Imran Khan on Thursday said that with the introduction of the ‘Digital Pakistan Vision’, the full potential of the contribution of youth and the women to the economy will be unleashed. According to a press release from the Prime Minister Office: “The Vision sets Pakistan’s digital ambition and has been designed for the government and the private sector to work towards a digitally progressive and inclusive Pakistan.” Speaking at the launch ceremony of the initiative, the prime minister regretted not having launched it at the very beginning when his government was formed. “I should have given attention to Digital Pakistan earlier. This is the most important thing for Pakistan right now, especially its youth. The whole world is moving forward digitally and we have been l


By Dawn
December 6, 2019