See More on Facebook

Politics

Hong Kong lawmaker stabbed while campaigning

Pro-Beijing Hong Kong lawmaker Junius Ho Kwan-yiu was stabbed by a knife-wielding man while canvassing votes on Wednesday morning.


Written by

Updated: November 7, 2019

Pro-establishment Hong Kong lawmaker Junius Ho Kwan-yiu was stabbed by a knife-wielding man while canvassing votes in Tuen Mun, New Territories, on Wednesday morning.

The attack renewed a growing call for the government to take necessary and effective efforts to ensure a fair and just District Council election, slated for Nov 24.

Ho, who was stabbed on the left side of his chest, was conscious when taken to Tuen Mun Hospital. Two more people from Ho’s campaign team suffered injuries to their hands and arms in the attack.

Around 9 am, a man dressed in blue and holding a bouquet approached Ho as a supporter. He fished out a knife from his bag while pretending to look for his cell phone after he had asked Ho to pose for a photo with him. The assailant was subdued at the scene and subsequently arrested by police.

In a statement issued around 11 am, Ho described the attack as “a dark moment” in Hong Kong’s District Council election. He said a spate of unlawful activities were impeding the electioneering of pro-establishment candidates but pledged to fearlessly continue his campaign.

The city has been haunted by protests, often violent, during the past five months.

Following the attack, the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region government stressed it has zero tolerance for violence.

A spokesperson for the SAR government said police would look into the attack and would strictly enforce the law to maintain law and order. Pointing out that Hong Kong had always been pluralistic and inclusive, the spokesperson said in a statement that people should be rational, peaceful and respectful when expressing opinions.

Chief Executive Carrie Lam Cheng Yuet-ngor condemned the attack. While in Beijing on Wednesday, Lam stressed the SAR government will make every effort to ensure a fair, safe and just election. Society as a whole should also step forward to oppose violent behavior that undermines the election, Lam said.

Ho is running for district councilor of Lok Chui, Tuen Mun. Lo Chun-yu and Chiang Ching-man are also vying for the seat.

The Guangdong-Hong Kong-Macao Greater Bay Area Youth Association called the attack “a blatant challenge to Hong Kong’s rule of law and election system”.

In a statement, the association said the attack was an outrageous crime that had not only endangered Ho and his election team, but also severely undermined the upcoming District Council election.

The association urged the SAR government and police to strictly enforce the law and keep candidates and their campaign teams safe so that a fair election could be held.

Stanley Ng Chau-pei, chairman of the Hong Federation of Trade Unions — the city’s largest labor union — also decried the attack.

Ng said “black terror” will not hold back candidates who truly love the city and want to contribute to its development.

The Democratic Alliance for the Betterment and Progress of Hong Kong said many DAB candidates had been harassed during electioneering. Some were besieged and had their offices broken into, set on fire and vandalized, DAB chairwoman Starry Lee Wai-king said.

Following the attack, the DAB met HKSAR Chief Secretary Matthew Cheung Kin-chung to discuss how to ensure a fair and safe election.

After the meeting, Lee said Cheung promised that the government would call an emergency meeting to discuss the situation.

Lee revealed that one of the party’s candidates was also attacked on Wednesday morning. She called on the government to beef up security at voting booths on Nov 24 to guarantee that voters can cast their ballots freely.

Echoing Lee, lawmaker Martin Liao Cheung-kong said the government has a duty to ensure the safety of candidates contesting an election.

Also on Wednesday, about 30 people handed a petition letter to Chairman of the Electoral Affairs Commission Fung Wah, urging the commission to scale up efforts to ensure the personal safety of candidates, voters and election volunteers, as well as fair elections.

“The riotous attack is to wipe out righteous voices by deterring residents from voting freely,” said local resident Fu Chun-chung at the EAC office building after Ho’s attack.



Enjoyed this story? Share it.


China Daily
About the Author: China Daily covers domestic and world news through nine print editions and digital media worldwide.

Eastern Briefings

All you need to know about Asia


Our Eastern Briefings Newsletter presents curated stories from 22 Asian newspapers from South, Southeast and Northeast Asia.

Sign up and stay updated with the latest news.



By providing us with your email address, you agree to our Privacy Policy and Terms of Service.

View Today's Newsletter Here

Politics

Dr M: Cabinet reshuffle, possibly before Apec

Malaysia’s ruling party suffered heavily in a recent bi-election. A Cabinet reshuffle must take place, said Tun Dr Mahathir Mohamad. The Prime Minister said that there will be some ministers who will be dropped but added that it will not be today or tomorrow. “Very likely before Malaysia hosts the Asia Pacific Economic Cooperation (Apec) summit next year,” said Dr Mahathir. Admitting that reshuffling would not be a solution to recover the waning popularity of Pakatan Harapan ruling coalition, as reflected in the recent Tanjung Piai by-election defeat, Dr Mahathir said it has to be done anyway. Pakatan received its worst by-election defeat in Tanjung Piai when its Bersatu candidate lost by more than 15,000 votes to MCA of Barisan Nasional on Nov 16. He said that the reshuffle should not be “radical” so as to affect the preparations of Malaysia to host Ap


By The Star
November 21, 2019

Politics

Court turns thumbs down on Thanathorn

The opposition leader loses his MP status. The Constitutional Court ruled on Wednesday (November 20) that Thanathorn Juangroongruangkit, leader of the Future Forward Party, lost his status as a member of Parliament on May 23, having registered to run in the March election while still holding shares in V Luck Media, in violation of the law. The court cited Articles 98 and 42 of the 2017 Constitution and the Organic Act on Election to the House of Representatives in characterising Thanathorn as prohibited from being elected as an MP. The Election Commission brought the matter to court, accusing him of still holding 675,000 shares in his family-owned media company when he registered his candidacy in the general election. Thanathorn failed to prove that he had transferred all shares to his mother, Somporn Juangroongruangkit, before registering.


By The Nation (Thailand)
November 21, 2019

Politics

Trade disputes between Korea and Japan show no sign of abating

President Moon Jae-in blames Japan’s export controls for GSOMIA withdrawal. Escalating trade tension between South Korea and Japan shows no sign of abating as two rounds of bilateral talks to resolve disputes triggered by Japan’s export curbs could not reach common ground. On Tuesday, the two neighboring nations held the second round of talks at the World Trade Organization in Geneva after failing to reach a consensus at the first consultations on Oct. 11. “During two rounds of six-hour intensive consultations, the two nations became more aware of each other’s measures and positions in the process. But we don’t think the two sides have changed their positions,” Chung Hae-kwan, director general in charge of legal affairs at the Trade Ministry, told reporters at a press briefing in Geneva following a meeting with his Japanese counterparts on Tuesday. “We pointed out that Japan’s exp


By The Korea Herald
November 21, 2019

Politics

Moon says volunteer military system needs time

The president says South Korea will transition to a volunteer army. South Korea needs to move to a volunteer military system, but the switch from the current conscription system will need time and preparation, President Moon Jae-in said Tuesday. “(A volunteer system) is something our society must move toward. But at present, the conditions are not right to introduce a volunteer system, (the change) needs to be planned in the mid- to long-term,” Moon said, speaking in a live televised question-and-answer session with 300 selected civilians. Moon said that measures such as increasing the number of professional soldiers and improving military har


By The Korea Herald
November 20, 2019

Politics

Beijing’s comments on HK court decision could signal direct intervention

Beijing has rejected a Hong Kong court decision. China has firmly rejected the Hong Kong High Court’s decision to overturn a controversial mask ban aimed at quelling violent protests, prompting experts to say the central government could soon act to ensure its constitutional authority over Hong Kong is not challenged. China’s Parliament and Cabinet both issued statements early on Tuesday (Nov 19) morning that the ruling challenged the authority of both the Hong Kong authorities and the central government. The response came a day after the city’s High Court ruled that th


By The Straits Times
November 20, 2019

Politics

What is Oplan Tokhang and why is it in the news?

A particular phrase has popped up a number of times in news from the Philippines in the past several days that is probably a mystery to much of the world. That phrase is Oplan Tokhang, a concept that is directly related to the country’s drug war. Discussions around this idea will be something to keep an eye on in the coming weeks and months. What is Oplan Tokhang? First, what does it mean? The word tokhang, is a made-up portmanteau of the local words for knock (tok) and plead (hangyo) and describes police operations that were launched by the Duterte administration in July of 2016 that involved officers going door to door to root out drug-related offenders. The phrase has become synonymous with the Duterte administration’s notoriously brutal war on drugs, with the word tokhang becoming directly associated with the killings r


By Quinn Libson
November 20, 2019